Speech pathologists know that teachers are busy and cannot give oodles of time to the child with a speech sound disorder. There are things that teachers can do that benefit all of the children in the class. Many teachers may find that they already use some of these strategies.

1. Have a letter of the week, with short activities (large group or small group) targeting that letter sound. Have children bring items from home that begin the letter of the week. Instruct families to help the child look for items or pictures to bring to school, which provides extra time focusing on the sound of the the week.

2. Another activity is to go around the circle thinking of words that begin with the sound of the week. Adults will probably need to help preschoolers think of words. The teacher can write the words.

3. Choose not to go in alphabetical order with the sound of the week. Also, save C and G for last, because they have two sounds each (hard and soft), which is confusing for preschool-kindergarten. Perhaps you might target sounds in the following order: B, M, P, N, T, D, S, R, F, L, J, K, W, Y, SH, CH, TH, ST, SP, PL, GR, short vowels. Note that digraphs CH, SH, and TH are actually single speech sounds.

4. Choose one child to be a reader and another child to be a scribe (I would use the word scribe even with young children). Have words printed on cards beforehand: 2-3 letters for age 4-5, 3-5 letters for K, and so on. Help the reader as necessary, so that she can say the word clearly for the class. The class can think about the sounds in the word, helping the scribe write the word correctly. If the child writes the word incorrectly, prompt but allow the children to try to correct it: "This says act, and the word was cat. Does anyone have an idea?"

5. Practice auditory blending as a class. Do not just call on the ones who are more capable, right? The skills would be syllable blending (cow+boy), onset-rime blending (t+op), and phoneme blending (b+a+ck). Think about the sounds rather than the letters. For example, the speech sounds in "back" are b+a+k, so it is a CVC word. Do auditory blending without reading or writing--this focuses on the skills that underlie literacy. Older children can do harder words. Sometimes it is helpful to use nonsense words with older children, so that they are truly using the speech sound processors in their brains, rather than relying on often-confusing English spelling. Example p+i+f = piff.

6. Practice other auditory manipulation skills, such as segmentation (syllable, onset-rime, phoneme), substitution (say "for" now change /f/ to /d/ = "door"), deletion (say stew, now say it without the /s/ = "two"), etc. Older children can do harder words. Sometimes it is helpful to use nonsense words with older children, so that they are truly using the speech sound processors in their brains, rather than relying on often-confusing English spelling. Example say pig, now change /g/ to /f/ = piff.

Examples of blending and segmentation can be found here.